Home Animals Badgers in Ohio

Badgers in Ohio

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badgers in utah

Native Badgers in Ohio have established a home throughout the state, taking up residence in grasslands and farms. They used their strong digging capabilities to burrow tunnels for permanent shelter as well as evade predators. 

As their numbers in Ohio grow each year, so too do local human populations – making habituating them harder than before. However, persistent conservation efforts by organizations like the US Fish & Wildlife service ensure that Ohio’s badger population can continue to thrive and coexist with humans across the state.

Badgers made their appearance as early as the late 19th century in Ohio. Badgers take well to new environments and quickly adapted to Ohio’s soil and climate. 

badgers in ohio

Habitat

In Ohio, badgers generally inhabit areas with short grass, such as pastures and fields – providing them plenty of opportunity to hunt for small rodents and insects.

Diet: What do badgers in Ohio eat?

Badgers are omnivores, meaning that they eat both plants and animals to get their nutrients. Their diet consists of insects, small animals like rodents, birds, eggs and reptiles, as well as a variety of plant matter such as fruits, roots, tubers and grasses. Badgers also enjoy a range of other food items like earthworms and even deer carcasses they come across in the wild. To hunt effectively in their nocturnal lifestyle, badgers have strong front claws and sharp teeth which they use to take down their prey. All these sources of food allow badgers to stay healthy in their diverse habitats throughout the world.

Colour

In Ohio, badgers have silver-grey fur on their back and shoulders, buff-coloured fur on either side of the body, and white fur around their eyes with black cheek patches. The contrast between these colours gives the badger a unique look that you won’t find in any other animal.

badger on rocks

Size, Lifespan and Weight 

Badgers are usually between 24-30 inches in length, have an average weight of roughly 15-25 pounds, and can live for up to 9 years in the wild. However, some badger species can live up to 16 years in captivity. 

Predators

Badgers face numerous predators in the wild, but their main enemy is the fox. Studies have shown that foxes are responsible for up to 90% of badger cub mortality and can be particularly aggressive during the spring cubbing season. Other wild predators include coyotes, wolves, raptors such as golden eagles and red-tailed hawks, dogs, weasels and various snakes. 

Reproduction

Badgers reproduce by mating with the opposite sex, typically after a courtship period. 

When successful mating has occurred, the female badger will produce a litter of three or four cubs approximately seven weeks later. The cubs are born blind and helpless, relying entirely on the care and protection of their parents. 

They are weaned between 6-8 weeks after birth and will live in the same den until they are independent enough to move out and find their own territory at around eight months of age. Although badgers can mate year-round, most litters are born during spring or early summer so that the cubs can take advantage of warmer weather and an abundance of food resources before winter arrives.

badger looking for food

Are there badgers in Ohio?

Yes, Badgers are available in Texas. A badger breed by the name (of Taxidea Taxus) is present because they are rarely visible due to their nocturnal nature..

Do badgers live in Ohio? 

Yes, they are present in Ohio, but they are classified as endangered species. 

What counties in Ohio have badgers?

As per Ohio History, Badgers have been reported to make their home in areas like Pickaway and Madison counties in the south-central part of the state, along with scattered regions of the southwest and northwest. It’s believed that badgers prefer open grasslands for their habitat, which is why they tend to be so much rarer than other mammal species here in Ohio. 

Are there honey badgers in Ohio?

Yes. Honey badgers are present in Ohio

Author Profile

A motivated philosophy graduate and student of wildlife conservation with a deep interest in human-wildlife relationships, including wildlife communication, environmental education, and conservation anthropology. Offers strong interpersonal, research, writing, and creativity skills.

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A motivated philosophy graduate and student of wildlife conservation with a deep interest in human-wildlife relationships, including wildlife communication, environmental education, and conservation anthropology. Offers strong interpersonal, research, writing, and creativity skills.

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