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Badgers in Colorado

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badgers

Colorado is home to many fascinating creatures, including the badger. These burrowing mammals are surprisingly well-adapted to the environment of Centennial State. With their keen sense of smell and their powerful bodies that can dig nearly anywhere, they can be found in many areas of Colorado at all elevations, searching for small rodents and other underground prey.

badgers in Colorado

Habitat

Badgers are found in a variety of habitats throughout Colorado, but they typically prefer open and dry grasslands with sandy or loamy soils. These underground scavengers can also be spotted in shrub country in mountainous regions and occasionally even in alpine meadows well above the tree lines. Their distinctive oval burrows are the key indicator that badgers have made their home nearby, offering them protection from harsh weather conditions and predators alike. 

Diet

Badgers in Colorado are omnivores, meaning that they eat both plants and animals to get their nutrients. Their diet consists of insects, small animals like rodents, birds, eggs and reptiles, as well as a variety of plant matter such as fruits, roots, tubers and grasses. Badgers in Colorado also enjoy a range of other food items like earthworms and even deer carcasses they come across in the wild. To hunt effectively in their nocturnal lifestyle, badgers have strong front claws and sharp teeth which they use to take down their prey. All these sources of food allow badgers to stay healthy in their diverse habitats throughout the world.

Colour

Badgers in Colorado are most easily identified by their distinct colouring; they sport a sandy yellow/brown coat with white bellies, while a black and white striped pattern adorns their face along with a white stripe down the nose. 

badgers in open

Size, Lifespan and Weight 

Badgers in Colorado are usually between 24-30 inches in length, have an average weight of roughly 15-25 pounds, and can live for up to 9 years in the wild. However, some badger species can live up to 16 years in captivity. 

Predators

Badgers in Colorado face numerous predators in the wild, but their main enemy is the fox. Studies have shown that foxes are responsible for up to 90% of badger cub mortality and can be particularly aggressive during the spring cubbing season. Other wild predators include coyotes, wolves, raptors such as golden eagles and red-tailed hawks, dogs, weasels and various snakes. 

Reproduction

Badgers reproduce by mating with the opposite sex, typically after a courtship period. 

When successful mating has occurred, the female badger in Colorado will produce a litter of three or four cubs approximately seven weeks later. The cubs are born blind and helpless, relying entirely on the care and protection of their parents. 

They are weaned between 6-8 weeks after birth and will live in the same den until they are independent enough to move out and find their own territory at around eight months of age. Although badgers in Colorado can mate year-round, most litters are born during spring or early summer so that the cubs can take advantage of warmer weather and an abundance of food resources before winter arrives.

badger

Are there badgers in colorado?

Yes, there are badgers throughout Colorado, but they typically prefer open and dry grasslands with sandy or loamy soils.

Do badgers live in colorado?

Yes, they live throughout Colorado

Are badgers protected in colorado?

Colorado Parks and Wildlife makes a point to manage the state’s wildlife populations as a part of its mission. Badgers are no exception, as it should be noted that CPW recognizes them as “nuisance wildlife” and permits landowners to take action in dealing with them if they pose a risk to people, property or livestock. If a badger is determined to be causing crop damage, real or personal property destruction, or harm to livestock, then landowners may legally hunt, trap or take the animal in Colorado. However, this should not be taken lightly; proper licenses and permits must always be respected before any steps are taken.

References:

https://cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/Wolverine-Identification-Guide.aspx

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A motivated philosophy graduate and student of wildlife conservation with a deep interest in human-wildlife relationships, including wildlife communication, environmental education, and conservation anthropology. Offers strong interpersonal, research, writing, and creativity skills.

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A motivated philosophy graduate and student of wildlife conservation with a deep interest in human-wildlife relationships, including wildlife communication, environmental education, and conservation anthropology. Offers strong interpersonal, research, writing, and creativity skills.

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